Landscape Photo
Photographer: Brian Horisk/AdventureArt, Fife, Scotland

Route Filmstrip & Description

Berry Head is Torbay's most important wildlife site, with many rare plants dependent upon the thin soils, mild climate and exposed conditions of the headland. The high cliffs are home to large numbers of nesting seabirds and it is a good place to spot sea mammals. The walk also visits the two Napoleonic war forts that dominate the headland, and Britain’s highest and smallest lighthouse. It is looked after by the Torbay Coast & Countryside Trust.

Surveyed by: Allan Ginman, July 2013 (Summer)
Accessibility Rating: 2More Information
Distance: 2.2 km

Public Transport: You can reach the start of the walk by bus no. 17 (hourly service) from Brixham town centre to Victoria Road. From here it is about a ½ mile walk to Berry Head. For timetable information, zoom in on the interactive map and click on the bus stops, visit Traveline or phone 0871 200 22 33.
Car Park: Pay and display at Berry Head (Postcode for Sat Navs: TQ5 9AL).
Steps: No
Barriers: No
Toilets: Berry Head Visitor Centre Car Park (disabled) and Guardian Café.

Full Profile

 

CarPark

The pedestrian gate may need some assistance to open.

Gate The pedestrian gate may need some assistance to open.

 

Gate

The main tarmac track climbs gently up towards the lighthouse at the end of the headland. There are benches at regular intervals along the path.

Start The main tarmac track climbs gently up towards the lighthouse at the end of the headland. There are benches at regular intervals along the path.

You can keep to the tarmac road or follow the gravel path.

Path You can keep to the tarmac road or follow the gravel path.

 

Path

Another accessible gate.

Gate Another accessible gate.

The path levels off, apart from a gentle rise and dip as you pass through the ramparts of the Northern Fort.

Gate The path levels off, apart from a gentle rise and dip as you pass through the ramparts of the Northern Fort.

Go through the narrow passageway between the North Fort walls, and you can imagine how difficult it would be for an enemy to get through here unscathed, with the defenders being able to attack them from above. On the ramparts on the left hand side are replica cannons.

Feature of Interest Go through the narrow passageway between the North Fort walls, and you can imagine how difficult it would be for an enemy to get through here unscathed, with the defenders being able to attack them from above. On the ramparts on the left hand side are replica cannons.

Just inside the Northern Fort is a café. Unfortunately the toilets here are not wheelchair accessible. Behind the café, a level but slightly uneven path (short grass) leads to the viewpoint that looks directly across to the guillemot colony on the cliffs
below the Southern Fort.

Cafe Just inside the Northern Fort is a café. Unfortunately the toilets here are not wheelchair accessible. Behind the café, a level but slightly uneven path (short grass) leads to the viewpoint that looks directly across to the guillemot colony on the cliffs below the Southern Fort.

The tarmac track  ends about 50 metres before the lighthouse. This last section is a wide rough stony track, with smoother grass on either side.

Path The tarmac track ends about 50 metres before the lighthouse. This last section is a wide rough stony track, with smoother grass on either side.

 

Path

The rough wide stony track continues as far as the lighthouse.

Feature of Interest The rough wide stony track continues as far as the lighthouse.

Here the exposed limestone has
created a rough stony ‘ramp’ down to a smoother grassy area stretching across the last few metres to the end of the headland, where
there are several seats, and a toposcope.

Path Here the exposed limestone has created a rough stony ‘ramp’ down to a smoother grassy area stretching across the last few metres to the end of the headland, where there are several seats, and a toposcope.

The Berry Head lighthouse came to be known as the smallest, highest and deepest light in the British Isles. The tower is only 5m/15ft high, requiring no further elevation than that given by the 58m/180ft high headland.

Feature of Interest The Berry Head lighthouse came to be known as the smallest, highest and deepest light in the British Isles. The tower is only 5m/15ft high, requiring no further elevation than that given by the 58m/180ft high headland.

According to this toposcope from here you can see over 2000 sq km/800 sq miles of sea. On a clear day the Isle of Portland, 42 miles away on the other side of Lyme Bay is visible.

Information According to this toposcope from here you can see over 2000 sq km/800 sq miles of sea. On a clear day the Isle of Portland, 42 miles away on the other side of Lyme Bay is visible.

Path

Back outside the fort.

Path Back outside the fort.

Turn right at the signpost.

Direction Turn right at the signpost.

 

Direction

Watch out for the car ramps.

Obstacle Watch out for the car ramps.

Here's another!

Obstacle Here's another!

 

Gate

Another gate - exactly the same as the first two.

Gate Another gate - exactly the same as the first two.

This path leads to the radio beacon.

Path This path leads to the radio beacon.

First for a view of the quarry and Tor Bay follow this path...

View First for a view of the quarry and Tor Bay follow this path...

... as it slopes 1:20 gently downhill. Stop when the slope becomes too steep for you. Return back to the Radio Beacon path.

View ... as it slopes 1:20 gently downhill. Stop when the slope becomes too steep for you. Return back to the Radio Beacon path.

This time take the path leading off the tarmac track. It is a 1 metre
wide rolled stone path, with a slightly loose surface. This path is virtually level apart from
a short gentle descent off from the tarmac track.

Direction This time take the path leading off the tarmac track. It is a 1 metre wide rolled stone path, with a slightly loose surface. This path is virtually level apart from a short gentle descent off from the tarmac track.

 

Path

Ahead is the radio beacon.

Path Ahead is the radio beacon.

 

Feature of Interest

From the radio beacon onwards, there is a
tarmac track.

Path From the radio beacon onwards, there is a tarmac track.

 

Path

 

Path

The track is initially flat, but then descends gently at first, and gradually
becoming steeper. This photo shows the view at the steepest section, and the gate at the end.

Path The track is initially flat, but then descends gently at first, and gradually becoming steeper. This photo shows the view at the steepest section, and the gate at the end.

 

Gate

The gap beside this gate (if you go partially onto the grass) is 1.2 metres.

Gate The gap beside this gate (if you go partially onto the grass) is 1.2 metres.

The final section is along a road, gently dipping downhill, with a shorter but slightly
steeper climb of 1:20 to return up to the car park.

Path The final section is along a road, gently dipping downhill, with a shorter but slightly steeper climb of 1:20 to return up to the car park.

 

CarPark

 

Toilets

Berry Head Phototrail

 

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Map Markers

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Accessibility Info Amenities Info Facilities Info Features Info Way Finding Info
Barrier
Clearance
Gate
Gradient
Obstacle
Seat
Step
Surface
Visibility
Width
Accessible toilets
Blue Badge parking bays
CarPark
Public Transport
Toilets
Bird Hide
Boating
Cafe
Fishing
Museum & Heritage
Shelter
Viewing Platform
Visitor Centre
Water  Sports Centre
Wildlife
Feature of Interest
Information
View
Direction
End
Path
Start

 

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Vertical Profile

This is an approximate vertical profile with samples taken at 100m intervals along the trail.

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